Spiritual Warfare Tactics

I write this post about one of the most important things I’ve learnt from healing teachings, specifically those of Curry Blake.

When engaging in spiritual warfare, attacking the works of Satan, one has to adopt a military approach. When one gets serious in God’s army it helps to study the principles of natural warfare.

I present you with the warrior ethos:

1. Always put the mission first. Prioritize your life decisions around the work of the Army. Gear how you spend your time, money, time and resources toward the Kingdom. Make disciples of all the world. Reach the world at any cost. This is your life mission.

2. Never quit. Be cautious to never get distraceted from the Great Commission.

With just these two points we could change the world.

3. Never accept defeat. If you fail, you learn from it and attack again.

4. Never leave a fallen comrade. If a brother falls, don’t kick him out because he is an embarrassment. Bring such a person back and restore him.

Next, we look at the Prime Directives.

1. Love the Lord your God with all your heart, mind and strength.

2. Love your neighbour as yourself.

3. Do to others as you would have done to you.

These directives encompass the entirety of Christianity. If we could manage to live these simple principles we will be the effective Christians the Bible teach us to be.

God at War – The Bible & Spiritual Conflict

This blog post is still in progress.

Here are some quotes from Gregory A. Boyd’s book entitled God At War

  • It is possible that our tendency to assume that the worldview we hold is ultimately the true worldview – is preventing us from seeing significant features of reality
  • If all evil is believed to serve a higher divine purpose, then clearly one’s sense of urgency in fighting it is compromised, while one’s ability to render it intelligible is diminished
  • The New Testament exhibits a church that is not intellectually baffled by evil but is spiritually empowered to vanquishing it, the Western tradition has more frequently exhibited a church that is perpetually baffled by evil but significantly ineffective and largely apathetic toward combating it.
  • The problem of evil that the New Testament authors grappled with was simply the problem of overcoming it. The problem of evil we Westerners usually grapple with is the problem of intellectually understanding what we unfortunately rarely seek to overcome
  • Abstractions distract us from that immediate reality of evil and reduce evil to a statistic
  • Only when the abstractions are put aside can we see the Devil gloating over suffering
  • Does God’s omnipotence necessarily entail that God is all-controlling, as the classical-philosophical tradition after Augustine has inclined us to assume?
  • Does affirming that God is omnipotent commit one to the view that a good divine purpose lies behind all particular events, no matter how evil?
  • Whenever we ask “Why do bad things happen to good people?” we are reflecting the widespread (and wrong) assumption that bad things are supposed to happen to bad people. That must be how God “get’s even” and sinners learn their lesson.
  • People suffer, we are to wrongly believe, because they deserve it!. This is not true
  • Like God, we are given a dominion of authority – the earth – not because God needs help, as in pagan mythology, but simply because having this sort of dominion is what being godlike means.
  • When we fight, we do not do so on our own power, but God himself reenacts his primal victory over these destructive forces through us.
  • When we “take up arms” against corporate greed, and when we follow the call of the Lord in feeding the hungry, clothing the naked, sheltering the homeless, befriending the guilty, embracing the socially repulsive, and siding with victims, we are participating in God’s cosmic struggle against cosmic chaotic forces of destruction.
  • We resist the anticreation forces that oppose God whenever we do anything that genuinely restores creation (incl. ourselves) to the place where God originally planned it to be.

You can find Gregory A. Boyd’s book, God At War, here: